Daddy Yankee says goodbye to New York with a Latin party in style

Daddy Yankee said goodbye to New York City this Tuesday with a Latin party in style: a two-hour concert that condensed the history of reggaeton, from its classic Gasoline to the songs of his latest album, Legendaddy.

The “king of reggaeton” transformed the Madison Square Garden stadium into a vibrant nightclub with a hyper-sharp resolution mega-screen, flares, laser beams and a group of tireless dancers who “twerked” relentlessly moving across a two-story stage.

Amid the cheers of a room with space for 20,000 people and all the tickets sold, Yankee made his triumphal entrance pretending to get off a plane, decked out in a gold sequined jacket and sunglasses, and premiered with the emblem of his retirement , Champion.

For the Puerto Rican singer, who described himself as a “man of few words and a lot of action,” this stop on his tour The last turn it had a special value, since it closed the first phase of the United States with its return to a key city for the urban genre.

“Since this movement was activated, it was an instant reaction in the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, and the first city that we quickly impacted since the 1990s, starting, was here in New York,” he commented, confessing to feeling “a shock of emotions.”

Yankee gave a legion of erudite fans of his catchy, sexual and funny lyrics those songs that have played on summer nights for the last two decades, such as break, What happened Y She lifted me upand other more recent ones, among which there was no lack Slowly.

With the typical bravado of reggaeton, he announced that he was going to sing “the song of the decade” and confessed that he was proud to have fulfilled one of his aspirations as a “little boy”: “If we can sing great songs in other languages, why Can’t we sing them in Spanish?

After the first guitar chords, the singer Luis Fonsi, who accompanies him in that song that marked a before and after in the reception of Latin music in the US, appeared virtually on the screen, joining a group of stars with whom he has collaborated.

Thus, the “Big Boss” shared the limelight with other pioneers of the genre who were portrayed performing songs like Mommy don’t leave me alonewith Wisin and Yandel; Your princewith Zion and Lennox; Dance Dance Dance with Ozuna; The Saint with Bad Bunny or Water with Rauw Alejandro.

In a very physical show, as required by reggaeton and its lyrical content, Yankee took advantage of the breaks so that the dancers exhibited “twerking” movements with brief outfits, while the dancers, with covered clothes, were disguised with giant heads.

The big heads fluttered near a huge inflatable doll made in the image of the singer who stood on stage in the last songs, complementing some impressive visuals that dazzled an audience at times more concerned with recording on their cell phones than dancing.

But as expected, the veteran artist, after 34 years of experience, knew what the final fireworks of his performance had to be: “The song that changed music forever, that went viral without social networks, the song that he made the world reggaeton”, he advanced.

In case there were any doubts, he added: “it’s expensive!” before the lows of the Gasoline revolutionized the stadium and an incendiary staging, with fire and gas cylinders, brought to their feet a devoted public that left their voices asking for more, as dictated by the chorus of that 2004 hit.

Yankee left in a shower of glitter and thanked Latinos for their “support from day one,” who flocked to say goodbye with tour t-shirts and national flags, and roared every time their idol named their countries. throughout the night.

One of them was Johanna, a New York fan of Puerto Rican descent who was encouraged to go alone after buying the ticket at the last minute and sang all the songs: “It was the last chance,” added the woman, expressing the general feeling of the event. EFE

Nora Quintanilla

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